News & Information
Costs and Taxes

When you buy property in your home country, you are usually faced with the associated costs like agent fees and taxes. Mexico is no different, although the net value of these costs as a percentage of the property values may be lower overall, but this is not guaranteed as professional fees have risen recently too.

Costs and Taxes: Buying

Acquisition Tax: This Tax is paid on the sale value of the property and is equivalent to about 2% depending on the State in which you buy. This tax is paid whether the property is sold, transferred, donated, placed into trust, split off or merged.

VAT (Sales Tax): No Value Added Tax (Sales Tax) is payable on residential property. Commercial Property transactions are liable to VAT at the current rate in addition to the Acquisitions Tax.

Appraisal Tax: The Tax Authority may choose to perform a commercial appraisal of the property after you purchase it. If the appraisal value is more greater than 10% of the price you paid for it, you will be asked to pay 20% tax on the difference between the two amounts. This sum is due within 15 days of the date of the appraisal report.

Registry Fee: In order to have the Public Records updated, a 1.3% fee (based on the value of the transaction) is paid by the buyer.

Public Notary Fees: You will be required to pay fees for services provided by the Notary Public. These are about 1.5% of the transaction value, plus the cost of the official appraisal (as described in Valuation section, for tax purposes)

Bank Trust: If you purchase property within the 50/100km restricted zones, you will need a bank to set up and manage a trust for you. Shop around, as prices vary from Bank to Bank. Set-up fees can cost up to US$750, with annual service charges between US$300-US$500. The annual service fee will cover legal obligations (e.g. the filing of necessary documents annually) by the bank on your behalf.

Lawyer / Attorney Fees: If you hire a lawyer / attorney, you will also need to pay him/her with fees for services they undertake on your behalf. These should be negotiated in advance.

Land / Building Surveys: If you need to undertake any land or building surveys, these will have to be paid for separately. Cost will depend on type, extent and complexity of surveys undertaken.

Foreign Office Permit: Your permit from the Mexican foreign office will cost around US$150.

Service Fees: If you are buying a house in a gated community, or an apartment, be sure to check on the annual service fees, and have these put in writing. Service fees can range from US$100 a year to US$1000 a year, depending on location, number of houses or apartments in the enclosure and amenities offered.

Title Insurance: When you buy property in Mexico, you would do well to consider purchasing Title Insurance. Rates are based on the sale value of the property and are charged at around US$5-US$5.50 per US$1,000 of the value. More Information about Title Insurance.
Costs and Taxes: Selling
When you sell a property in Mexico, you will be subject to the fees of any professional services you contract, plus the following taxes and fees:

Income Tax on Property Gains: If the home has not been your main residence for at least the last two years, will be required to pay income tax on the property. You may either pay 20% on the gross amount of the transaction, or elect to pay 40% tax on the net profit obtained from the property. This law prevents short-term speculation on the property market. Commercial property is taxed at above rates, regardless.

Agent Fees: If you employ an agent, expect charges of around 3-6% of the value of the sale as a fee, but you may want to negotiate on this beforehand. You will also need to pay VAT (Sales Tax) on agent fees.

U.S. institutions gear up loan programs for Mexican land rush
By STEVE McLINDEN
February 2, 2005
Pacific Mexican Renaissance:
The coveted coastline of Mexico is now available for foreign investment.

The Luxury of Home, in Mexico
By Janelle Brown
January 7, 2005

New York Times

Mexico Dreaming:
For real estate fantasists, nothing beats an empty stretch of beachfront. Just add house.
Buying Real Estate in Mexico:
Separating Fact from Fiction
Capital Gains in Mexico:
What you do today dictates your tax liabilities tomorrow.
Building in Mexico:
Manifesting Your Construction
The History of Mexican Land
The History of Land Ownership in Mexico
What Can An American Buy in Mexico?
Costs and Taxes
Financing Your Mexican Property Investment
Ejido Lands
The Role of the Notary Public in Mexico
Outline Property Purchase Procedure
Buy or Build, or "Fixer-Upper"?
Valuation of Property in Mexico
What's Doing In Puerto Vallarta
By TIM WEINER
Published: October 7, 2001
lapuntarealty.com
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